Which wi-fi are you using?

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by kcut, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. kcut

    kcut Well-Known Member

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    My router allows users to connect using the 802.11 g or n standards. However, a new one has just been released called the ac standard that allows you to use wifi at gigabit speeds :blink:

    Here is some info for those not up to date with wireless technologies:
    http://www.maximumpc.com/best_ac_router_2014

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Maarten

    Maarten Member

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    I am using a ASUS RT-N66U - a dual-band router. It is supposed to do 300-600 Mbps by combining channels, and it tests at full speed on my 100 Mbit/s connection.
     
  4. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    Good question really, all I know it's that gives me 100MB speed, which is more than I need really because my computer is fairly slow. I was looking for the specs and here they are, Wifi b/g/n up to 300Mbps.
     
  5. kcut

    kcut Well-Known Member

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    These things cost more than the regular n standard routers so i think it will take a while before ISP's roll them out to customers. Also, it will take a long time before people replace their existing wireless machines with AC capable laptops, smartphones, etc..

    I think the n standard is pretty good and certainly adequate for domestic use. However, if we start talking about ultraHD and other forms of high definition then getting some AC in your home could definitely reap some rewards. It might even end all that annoying buffering!
     
  6. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    Just recently I've upgraded my contract for less money and my speed has increased to 120MB. To be honest I haven't put it to the test because the speed is more than enough for me, but the equipment is the same.
     
  7. AresBlade

    AresBlade Well-Known Member

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    Last week I upgraded my router to the new WRT1900AC. It works great! I don't have any AC wireless devices, but I love the manageability and flexibility that's provided to the N networks right out of the box. It's not cheap, but the quality seems worth it so far. Can't wait until I do have some AC devices so I can actually play with beamforming networks.
     
  8. Amenokaji

    Amenokaji Active Member

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    My router is a bit old, it's a Linksys wireless G router. I need to upgrade it but lack of money and no real desire or need to do it yet has kept me from going through with it. Although my router has been dropping my internet connection lately, so it might be time, but that could also be time warners crappy service.
     
  9. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    I am really happy with my service, it's very rare that I lose my connection, way better than the contract I had with Vodafone, but it was just a 3G pen back then.
     
  10. drestauro

    drestauro Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you use WPA2 for security on the "n" routers. If you use WPA (or Wep) you will be stuck at the "G" limit.
     
  11. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    What do you mean by that Drestauro, to be stuck in the "G" limit?
     
  12. drestauro

    drestauro Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, I now realize that wasn't clear. The 802.11g max speed is 54Mbps. 802.11n has a max of 600Mbps. If you have an 802.11n router, but are using WEP or WPA encryption, you won't be able to get above 54Mbps (The "g" limit, as I poorly put it). The ability of 802.11n to get to 600 Mbps requires a more advanced encryption algorithm, like WPA2.
     
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  13. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    Thanks for the explanation Drestauro. In fact, at home I am just using cable because I saw it's way faster, but at work they recently changed the security to WPA2, most likely because of the speed?
     
  14. drestauro

    drestauro Well-Known Member

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    If they were using 802.11n then yes. It's quite a considerable upgrade in speed for little effort.
     
  15. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    I think we were using G as well, but the protocol was WPA and not WPA2, don't know why they changed that.
     
  16. drestauro

    drestauro Well-Known Member

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    [SIZE=10.5pt]The most expensive part of upgrading the wireless networking standard is the clients. Many companies build it into their hardware refresh cycle. What they typically do is upgrade the main routers to 802.11n. However all the clients (desktops, laptops, smartphones, etc) still use an 802.11g wi-fi card. As they bring in new clients they put N cards in them, then the card upgrade is part of normal IT operations. The mistake most make is taking down the 802.11g access points. For maximum network efficiency you should leave up the "g" network, add the "n" work, and run both simultaneously. Since the standards run at different frequencies there won't be any interference and you can segment the clients to the correct access point. This means your 802.11n router doesn't have to operate in mixed mode allowing it to realize its full potential and create a more efficient wi-fi network.[/SIZE]
     
  17. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    Are you a network technician Drestauro? You talk like a real expert, you seem like my colleagues when they start talking about our network. :)
     
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  18. drestauro

    drestauro Well-Known Member

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    :D Not specifically. I was a Unix Admin for 5 years. For the last 5 I've been an Enterprise Architect. While it sounds fancy, it just means I need to figure out how to get the most business value out of technology. I work in the Public sector, so it's usually an uphil climb :)
     
  19. Gelsemium

    Gelsemium Founding Member Founding Member

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    So you are a developer, you need to have a lot of knowledge. I wish I had my formation in that area, it's really well paid. Even in the public sector! :)
     

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